Child Abuse Dominates Headlines

“Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe to stumble, it would be better for him if, with a heavy millstone hung around his neck, he had been cast into the sea."

Mark 9:42 (NASB)

Greenwich, CT Millstone (from Wikipedia)

 

Unless you've been living under a rock, you're all too familiar with the following headlines:

 

Spare the Rod, Spoil the Disabled Child:  The Hillary Adams Beating Video  (Forbes 11/3/11)

"It (the video) shows a Texas County Court-at-Law Judge, William Adams, who mainly presides over cases involving children, sadistically beating his 16-year-old disabled daughter Hillary, for downloading music files from the Internet. The video was secretly shot by Hillary, who suffers from ataxic cerebral palsy, back in 2004, but not released until October 27 of this year, seven years after the act."

 

Preaching Virtue of Spanking, Even as Deaths Fuel Debate (New York Times 11/6/11)

"The pastoral mood in the hills of Tennessee offered a stark contrast to the storm raging around the country over the Pearls’ teachings on child discipline, which advocate systematic use of “the rod” to teach toddlers to submit to authority. The methods, seen as common sense by some grateful parents and as horrific by others, are modeled, Mr. Pearl is fond of saying, on “the same principles the Amish use to train their stubborn mules.”

Debate over the Pearls’ teachings, first seen on Christian Web sites, gained new intensity after the death of a third child, all allegedly at the hands of parents who kept the Pearls’ book, “To Train Up a Child,” in their homes. On Sept. 29, the parents were charged with homicide by abuse."

 

Penn State Scandal: 'Nice Guy' Pedophiles Groom Their Victims, Experts Say (ABC News 11/7/11)

"His ('nice guy') profile resonates in the case of Penn State former football coach Jerry Sandusky, who has been charged in connection with the molestation of eight boys over a 15-year period, all of whom he met though an underprivileged boy's program that he founded. Police claim one 10-year-old boy was raped in the football locker room shower in 2002.

Sandusky, 67, has refused to answer questions, telling ABC News that his lawyers told him not to discuss the case.

The university has barred Sandusky from its campus. The college's athletic director and vice president have stepped down after being charged with allegedly covering up the abuse.

Pedophiles come in many forms, but the one who often gets away with sexual molestation and is least understood is the "nice guy" — not the abusive father or the stranger who kidnaps a child, but the trusted doctor, teacher or coach…

Frequently, the "nice guy" molester is a babysitter, next-door neighbor or a Boy Scout leader or parish priest or minister, he said."

 

How unconscionable and heartbreaking that the most vulnerable members of society — children — are being subjected to horrible abuse, often at the hands of their own parents or those who cunningly gain their trust.  Shame on anyone who would harm an innocent child! 

And to make matters worse, there are individuals who are willing to help hide child abuse in order to preserve the outward appearance of a marriage, a church, a "family of churches", a denomination, a university, etc.  What is wrong with this picture? 

We are grateful that the secular media is calling attention to these newsworthy stories.  Where are those in the Christian community who are speaking out against such criminal behavior and helping the victims?  As Christians, doesn't God call on us to get involved with those in dire need? 

Instead, we have pastors such as John Piper who counsel women to put up with verbal abuse for a "season" and physical abuse for a night, we have a family of churches (SGM) that purportedly deals with spousal and child abuse in-house instead of involving the authorities, and we have the largest Protestant denomination in the country (SBC) refusing to set up a database of convicted pedophile pastors.  The list could go on, but you get the picture.  If you've been reading here for any length of time, you know our hot-button issues, and so many of them deal with some form of abuse.

As we have said over and over and over again, we MUST keep our eyes on the victims instead of protecting the guilty.  Shame on any professing Christian, especially leaders, who will not speak out against known abuse, whether it be emotional, physical, or spiritual.  We believe Mark 9:42 applies to perpetrators as well as accomplices.  Incredibly, the secular media is boldly doing what the Christian community should be doing. 

Praise God there are a few voices in Christendom that are speaking out, mostly in the blogosphere.  We are grateful to Kris and Guy over at SGM Survivors, Jim at SGM Refuge, and Tom Rich at FBCJaxWatchdog who are speaking up despite criticism.  The "Dawg" provided some excellent advice in a post regarding the Penn State debacle that we want share with our readers.  Here is what Tom had to say regarding sexual abuse: (link)

"Church members, let this be a lesson to you: don't ever, ever, report sexual abuse at your church or by a member or minister, to the pastor or to a minister or deacon or trustee. They cannot be trusted to do the right thing. Any person, whether it is a head football coach or a minister or a school administrator, who has a vested interest in the institution that is somehow connected to the victim or perpetrator, can't be trusted with the information!! As William Thornton wrote today about this, there is only one thing to do when you hear of sexual abuse: stop, pick up your cell phone, and call your local police department. Report what you saw or heard, and let THEM investigate. If they need to tell your pastor, they will…

And so it is with the institutions of government, religion, and education.

Report sexual abuse to the police department, don't go to the coach, the preacher, the teacher, or your boss.

Go straight to the cops."

We are grateful that the secular media is headlining these awful cases of child abuse, and we pray that Christians will take notice and stop being so fearful about speaking up.  God is watching and expecting us to intervene on His behalf.  May He give us the courage to confront crimes perpetrated on innocent children.

Lydia's Corner:  2 Chronicles 35:1-36:23    1 Corinthians 1:1-17    Psalm 27:1-6   Proverbs 20:20-21

Comments

Child Abuse Dominates Headlines — 67 Comments

  1. If anyone wants to research child abuse and how to protect your kids, the most amazing book on the subject is Protecting The Gift by Gavin DeBecker. He shows parents how to be alert for the schemes and tricks of perpetrators. DeBecker is not a believer, but is an amazing advocate for parents and children….he shows how sexual abuse is very common, but most parents worry instead about kidnapping, which is very rare.

  2. Deb, thank you for including material about Sandusky and PSU in this post. PSU officials have been asleep at the wheel for years, it seems.

    And Sandusky’s “charity” for at-risk kids (called The Second Mile, believe it or not) is where he found – and groomed – all but one of the victims listed in the PA grand jury presentment. I feel sick to my stomach, knowing that there are likely many, many more victims who have not come forward, or who feel unable to do so.

    On top of all that… Sandusky gave a commencement address at the main campus of Penn State in 2007. His last football camp on a Penn State campus (Behrend, in Erie, PA) was in 2009.

    He was only just barred from setting foot on campus as of last Friday.

    WTF???!!!!!

  3. Thanks for that book tip by Gavin DeBecker. I’ve read his book The Gift of Fear which is great, but this one also looks good.

    Another book that is helpful for waking parents up is called Conversations with a Pedophile by Amy Hammel-Zabin. It’s a tough read, but worthwhile imo.

    http://www.amazon.com/Conversations-Pedophile-Interest-our-Children/dp/1569802475/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1320901017&sr=1-1

    Sexual abuse is one topic most people want to pretend does not exist. I applaud the Wartburg sisters for continuing to keep this issue on the front burner, especially as it impacts the institutional “church” and then subsequently the reputation of the true church.

    (Deb and Dee, I know you’re not real sisters, but you are sisters in the Lord.)

  4. Eagle – a *lot* of us wish we had answers to those questions.

    There appears to have been a pervasive atmosphere of coverups, lies, looking the other way… so many things were stopped almost before they started (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/10/sports/ncaafootball/aftermath-of-1998-sandusky-investigation-raises-additional-questions.html?ref=sports )

    I think this is going to be a long and ugly investigative process. (And I personally feel like a whole lot of people have earned time in the slammer, but my opinions are another thing entirely!)

  5. Also… the grand jury findings in the Sandusky (et. al.) case have been eclipsed by the outcry over Paterno.

    Which leaves the victims in the shadows.

    Just. so. wrong.

  6. justabeliever,

    Thanks for recommending the book Protecting The Gift by Gavin DeBecker. We’ll definitely be checking it out!

  7. numo,

    The Penn State story is so big that I couldn’t leave it out.

    Well, JoePa is now history… He’ll have the rest of his life to think about what he should have done.

    I’m grateful that someone at Penn State (the trustees) is finally taking the issue of child rape seriously.

  8. Being quite cynical, I’m not thinking the trustees at Penn State particularly take the issue of child rape seriously.

    I’m thinking they take the issue of their immense endowment VERY SERIOUSLY.

    As for Jo-Pa, there will forever be an asterisk next to name, accomplishments and reputation.

  9. Seneca,

    At least the Penn State trustees did the right thing, regardless of their true motive. May ALL of us learn some important lessons on reporting child sex abuse.

  10. Mark 9:42 Carries a pretty heavy warning. It is astonishing how many feel free to ignore it. Yet there are so many things that Jesus said that people ignore, all the while claiming to serve Him. This is equally astonishing.

  11. Ted
    Thank you. As a nurse, i followed up with child abuse and neglect for three years. Then, both of us were approached by a friend to tell us that a church I attended had not reported an incident of child sexual abuse. It turned our world upside down. We will never forget that day and are committed to change in this area. Anyone who does not report any sort of abuse of a child is not fit to run any program, secular or ecclesiastic, period!

  12. Eagle
    Here is the dirty little secret, both within the church and without. Way too many people turn a blind eye to sexual abuse. Why? Is it the topic? Do they doubt the seriousness of the matter. i know one church in which some pastor blew off a guy who was encouraging kids to expose themselves. They called it, take a deep breath, “locker room humor.” I call such analysis despicable. By the way these same guys think they are patriarchs, in positions of authority. Yeah, right. Warning to those who know to what I am referring. I am not done with this subject by an stretch of the imagination.

    Now, here is my two cents worth. I believe that, f more women were in positions of leadership both within the church and within school sports, there would be less of this stuff tolerated. Why? Women are far less enamored of locker room behavior. Don’t get me wrong. Most of the guys I have met on this blog are real men who would intervene in this sort of situation.

  13. Numo
    I hope it is lengthy, drawn out and gets lots of press. It is time this stuff is exposed to the public for what it is. Shame on all of them.

  14. The next step will be the former Penn State football players who will come forward and say that there were rumors and jokes for years about what a pervert Sandusky was. According to the grand jury report, people all the way from the janitor to the president of the university, knew of the guy’s sex acts in the showers of the Penn State locker room. You don’t think the players got wind of this?

  15. Deb

    First, great post. Keep going after this topic.

    Secondly, you said “I’m grateful that someone at Penn State (the trustees) is finally taking the issue of child rape seriously.” What they are taking seriously is the media coverage and the potential damage to money coming into the sport program. Does this remind you of another incident that you and I were involved in? Remember how they went loony when the media got involved? And, didn’t they lose some income as well over it?

  16. In some ways, I think the fault lies with the graduate assistant coach who saw actual abuse and waited until the next day to do anything about it. His report went to his father and to Paterno. Paterno reported it to the AD and the VP who had oversight of the campus police (in many states, including Texas, the campus police have investigatory and arrest power like any PD). The VP reported it to the staff of the entity employing the perp. Apparently an earlier incident was also reported to the campus police. I think that that department needs to be cleaned up and the grad asst coach needs to have some liability here. I think the heat on Paterno is misplaced as it seems he did what he was legally required to do and in an organization, what his responsibility was to do.

    BTW, we do not know exactly what the grad asst coach reported to Paterno either.

    If it is reported to the jurisdictional police department, is that not what one is supposed to do?

  17. Mara
    People ignore the millstone and thrown into the abyss warning every day, I don’t think they worry about it because they are “saved.” For some churches, children are simply a means to an end-get parents in the door and giving and perhaps raise up the next generation of givers. As more and more churches are stung by their cavalier attitudes to the protection of children, more safeguards are being put into place.

    Jesus always did things differently. He cared for the children (for such is the kingdom of heaven), the poor in spirit, the outcasts of society. His ways were diametrically opposed to the world’s way of doing business.

  18. Arce
    If reports in the media are accurate (and as we know, that is questionable) that assistant witnessed the abuse in process. if this is the case, he had a moral obligation to stop the assault. If I had seen that incident, Sanduskey would have been wearing scratches and i would have been arrested for assault. The police would have been on that campus in droves!

  19. Tom R
    Kudos to you for your excellent reporting on this situation! Folks, go on over to FBC Jax Watchdog and read his series here

  20. Thank you Dee for posting about this horror. Al Mohler has an article posted this morning–some quotes:

    “Church leaders and pastors must decide now — not later — that we will respond to any report of sexual abuse with immediate action and an immediate call to law enforcement officials.”

    and:

    “We all need an immediate reality check. I discovered yesterday that the policy handbook of the institution I am proud to lead calls for any employee receiving a report of child abuse, including child sexual abuse, to contact his or her supervisor with that report. That changes today. The new policy statement will direct employees receiving such a report to contact law enforcement authorities without delay. Then, after acting in the interests of the child, they should contact their supervisor.”

    http://www.albertmohler.com/2011/11/10/the-tragic-lessons-of-penn-state-a-call-to-action/

    I hope and pray all churches do this. I pray this really happens.

  21. The Penn State scandal hits close to home for me. In 1990, as a senior journalism major at Penn State, I had the opportunity to interview Jerry Sandusky for a cable television program called “Hidden Heroes.” The coach was promoting his charity, the Second Mile Foundation.

    Looking back in light of what’s transpired, the most chilling memory of that interview was the “b-roll” we played during the middle part of the program: It was Coach Sandusky in the university natatorium playing around with young kids in the swimming pool.

    The second most chilling thing? That Coach Sandusky was the nicest guy you’d ever want to meet.

  22. Eagle

    First, go on over to FBC Jax, link in my last comment to Tom. it is patently clear that this situation was ignored by at least a couple of people. I saw this at a church. It happens-see no evil.

    Now as for God, this is a matter of free will. If God created us without choice, then He is the author of a bunch of automatons. In fact, He created us and we are born with an innate sense of right and wrong. Ask anyone to justify raping a 10 year old kid. Unless they are mentally ill, they will categorically say it is wrong. Now, if God is to intervene, where does it stop?Obviously, we all agree about the child abuse. How about the guy who is drinking and causing his family heartache? How about the school bully who is harassing another child? God has allowed us our choices and this is what it brought us. One day, it will all stop. There will be no more child abuse, wars, drunk driving that kills a mother, etc.

    At that point, the choosing is over. We made out choice, we screwed up royally and all will be put back in order. And the Sanduskeys of the world will be made to pay for their trespasses and if Scripture is to be believed, he’d better start repenting pronto.

  23. Pingback: [Christian] child abuse dominates headlines « A Quiver Full of Information UNITED STATES

  24. Deb and all,

    Great article! When this story first broke, the first question that popped in my head was “Why didn’t McQuery (the grad assistant) and Paterno call the police and why weren’t they arrested too?” I have listened to ESPN for several days straight, and those guys are covering this story extensively. I, too, am grateful for secular media’s focus on the victims and horrors of these crimes and the complicity and cover-up by many involved.

    Many sexual abuse victims would testify that the abuse, as horrific as it is, hurt them less than the betrayal of those who turned a blind eye and covered it up. Perhaps McQuery and Paterno fulfilled their legal responsibility to report the sexual assault witnessed by McQuery, but they failed miserably in their moral responsibility to rescue the victim, follow up on their reports, and protect future victims. McQuery and Paterno knew full well that Sandusky continued to be a major threat to children, and he was allowed on campus for years afterwards participating in events and activities involving kids. Obviously, they knew that Sandusky wasn’t being investigated after the sexual assault witnessed by McQuery, so they knew law enforcement hadn’t been contacted. I don’t see how what they did is legal and that they can’t be held accountable legally.

    Personally, I think McQuery was scared of what would happen to the Penn State football program, the “legends” of Paterno and Sandusky, and his own job and that’s why he didn’t immediately rescue the young boy and call police. Paterno knew he had to disclose it the Athletic Director (although Paterno called the shots – not the AD), because there had been a witness, and they had to figure out together how to make it all go away.

    Paterno’s statement infuriated me. Why would he be SHOCKED? He knew exactly what Sandusky had done, and he’d known it for years. If he really grieves for the victims, he would have done something about the 10-year boy assaulted in the shower and all the kids who were abused or put at risk for years afterwards.

    An attorney was on ESPN this morning discussing future legal ramifications for McQuery, Paterno, and Penn State. He reiterated a comment made by a former Penn State player who said there is a train coming, and it’s getting louder and it’s not going away. It’s going to wreck soon. The lawyer said this is an open investigation, and he believes the state will look more closely at McQuery and Paterno, and it’s a possibility they will end up being charged at some point. He also said he has no doubt there will be lawsuits by the victims brought against the university and all those complicit in the cover-up.

  25. dee on Thu, Nov 10 2011 at 09:13 am

    Assaulting a miscreant in the act of harming an innocent is a defense against a charge of assault (and even of murder if that was required to stop the harm). You may have been arrested and perhaps charged, but the testimony that the child was being raped and you intervened to stop the rape would, in all likelihood, leave you to be found innocent of any malfeasance. The malfeasance here was the failure to intervene.

  26. Couldn’t agree more with what’s being discussed.

    The only thing i have to add to the conversation is in response to justabeliever’s comment on the book “Protecting The Gift” by Gavin DeBecker:

    “DeBecker is not a believer, but is an amazing advocate for parents and children….”

    Honestly, if DeBecker was a believer and his book was published under a christian lable and sold in christian book stores, credibility would be lost (as far as I’m concerned).

    My experience with topical christian books is that critical thinking, as well as thorough and honest research & presentation, go out the window. What is substituted is filler that rings with christian rhetoric. It’s easier, and (embarrassingly so) probably sells better.

    I tend to think that there are too many “christians” out there who have overestimated their ability to write (& song-write), and somehow conclude that because they are “indwellt with the Holy Spirit”, what they produce will be nothing short of remarkable and deserves to be in print. Either that or the editors purposely try to water & dumb things down so they will sell.

    I could care less whether someone with expertise is a believer or not.

  27. Everyone, beginning with the grand jury, has chosen to believe some statements about events and to disbelieve others. But grand juries make mistakes, which is why their charges are subject to a further legal process. That process has not occurred, and the response seems to me to be a bit of a leap to conclusion and mob mentality. I believe it would behoove everyone to slow down and allow the legal process to proceed. A bit more caution in leaping to conclusions may be appropriate.

    We do not know exactly what the graduate assistant coach reported to Paterno, what Paterno reported to the AD and Sr. VP, and exactly why. But if the testimony of the AD and Sr. VP was true, and not perjurous, then the testimony of someone else was. And quite frankly, it was in the interest of the graduate assistant coach to say that his report was specific, even if it were not.

    To me, the great fault was the failure of the graduate assistant coach to stop the rape in progress and make a citizens arrest of Sandusky. McQuery clearly knew what was going on and did not stop it nor immediately report it, and, as a recently former football player, clearly had the physical chops to intervene.

    BTW, in many places, including Texas, the campus police are full fledged police with the authority to investigate and arrest. Reporting to the administrative superior over the police department would seem to me to fulfill Paterno’s reporting obligation!!!

    I believe that the Christian response and the mob mentality response are not the same, and in fact incompatible.

  28. To our readers

    TWW has decided to get involved in a practical way to protect children. Once the effort is underway, we will inform our readers since it involves an element of surprise. If it works, it might be something for others to consider as well. Keep us in your prayers.

  29. Dee

    I should be the policy of every organization that any discovery or report of possible child abuse must be immediately reported to the police AND child welfare agency, and the policy should contain the numbers. Signs should be posted to the effect and the telephone number should be on the signs. The policy should also state that the person making a report will not suffer adverse consequences so long as they report what they know (e.g., a child’s statement, what they believe they saw) even if the report is not later substantiated. Reporting within the organization should immediately FOLLOW reporting to the authorities, and all supervisors receiving a report should immediately inquire as to whether the authorities were notified.

  30. I oppose the death penalty in all cases, but could possibly accept it for a killing in prison or by someone already convicted of murder. For child rapists, I think a surgical procedure that removed the ability to rape a child would be an appropriate penalty, to cut off, so to speak, the ability to do so again.

  31. Arce,

    I agree that McQuery should have rescued the child right there on the spot and contacted police immediately. My oldest child is close to 10, and I can’t imagine something like this happening to her and a 28-year old man walking right past it and allowing it to continue.

    While it’s true that we don’t know exactly what he told Paterno, it’s irrelevant in terms of Paterno’s responsibility. It doesn’t matter how vague or graphic his report was. Bottom line, Paterno got a visit from McQuery and his dad at his home. He knew Sandusky was in the shower with a child, reported it to the AD, then never followed up. Sandusky continued to show up on campus and participated in events involving children while McQuery, Paterno, the AD, the Finance guy, and Spanier all had some knowledge of Sandusky’s criminal behavior (regardless of how specific).

  32. And to the VP over the police department. Which is where, if all of the testimony the grand jury took as true is in fact true, the reporting link was broken and should not have been. Except it appears that someone in that link notified the people at the outside program where the children were actually enrolled, which is the responsible entity for those children, and they should have reported it to the authorities. Some laws are explicit in who is responsible for reporting, and it usually is the facility or organization that has supervisory responsibility for the CHILDREN, not the perp.

  33. Um… you’re all aware that Mike McQueary is supposed to be coaching this Saturday’s PSU v. Nebraska game, right?

    The firings last night did NOT go far enough. McQueary should be out; others in the athletic department and administration (including 2 who are under indictment for perjury – Curley and Schultz) should be out on their *sses. And – I’m sure – many, many others.

    I know I’m armchair quarterbacking here… but here’s what I think: shut down the football program. Suspend it, or eliminate it.

    Paterno has given millions of dollars to PSU. There’s even a Paterno Library, as well as the Paterno statue (a shrine, really) over by Beaver Stadium. Are these huge monetary gifts an attempt to salve an uneasy conscience as well as keep the blinders over the eyes of alums, faculty and the rest of us (both PSU employees and locals)?

    I think so.

    Right now I’m truly disgusted with the university, with the inflated reputation that Paterno and the football program have had for so many years (he’s like a god around here), and definitely sickened re. The Second Mile (Sandusky’s “charity”), which has been SO highly-touted up to this point – and is worth a LOT of $$$.

    Note: The Second Mile has been in existence since 1977. That is chilling. Everyone around Sandusky HAD to have known what he was doing. The good old boys closed ranks – all for the sake of the g’damned football team.

  34. About this Saturday’s game: cancel it. Just stop it.

    I think (based on last night’s riots) that there is major potential for violence, and frankly, the campus police force can’t (imo) handle it. State College police (town, adjoining the campus) are overwhelmed as it is and one riot (the 2nd this year) is *more* than enough.

    What’s sad: there was a candlelight prayer vigil for Sandusky’s victims last night at the Nittany Lion statue, and other peaceful demonstrations, too – but they’ve all been overshadowed by the kids who vandalized and rioted and….

    (I need a break from this stuff!)

  35. “We all need an immediate reality check. I discovered yesterday that the policy handbook of the institution I am proud to lead calls for any employee receiving a report of child abuse, including child sexual abuse, to contact his or her supervisor with that report. That changes today. The new policy statement will direct employees receiving such a report to contact law enforcement authorities without delay. Then, after acting in the interests of the child, they should contact their supervisor.”

    Too bad Al Mohler did not give this advice to his buddy CJ Mahaney. Instead, Mohler exonerated CJ and SGM in the press ignoring all the stories of sexual abuse in SGM where the pastors told victims families NOT to call the authorities. Al Mohler speak out of both sides of his mouth. Al does not believe the vast amount of victims who have came forward out of sgm. Why? Protecting his reputation because of his alliance with CJ over the years. Al is a phoney.

  36. I am disturbed by this whole scandal and the lack of integrity by those who were aware of it and didn’t do all they could to stop it. I got really upset last night that the media was covering the story of the rioting students, and more upset that the students are even rioting. They seem to have no concern for victims but much concern for their beloved sports. I pray this guy pleads guilty to ALL counts and that the now young men do not need to come forward in a public trial. Although I’m sure the media would love to cover such a trial.

    FYI – I watch a lot of sports with my husband and sons, so no sports hater here.

  37. Dee and Deb –

    Can’t wait to hear how we can help be involved. I’m thankful that I have been asked to help make sure our policies and safeguards are in order at my locale. It really isn’t that difficult to have safeguards in place. It makes it all the more difficult to understand “why” these cases go unreported for so long. The “why not report” seems to be some internal lack of recognizing the hidiousness of the acts and how it affects the victims. More thought is given to the institutions, reputations, and even the perp. (UGH!!!!! to all of this pride). When will our society realize that perps don’t stop themselves.

  38. Bridget2: the investigation is far from over – it’s only just starting. I don’t know what comes next, but the State Attý General (Linda Kelly) has been asking other victims and witnesses to step forward and contact her office.

    The Feds will be investigating for violations of the Clery Law (via the Dep’t. of Education).

    and i am SURE that much of the upcoming investigation (and trials) will be focused on The Second Mile.

    God, I wish none of this had ever happened. It’s very painful.

    Also… tom Corbett (Gov. of PA) just urged those attending the Sat. game to participate in the “blue out” that’s planned (demonstration in the stands) on behalf of Sandusky’s victims. There is a Facebook page for that.

    Check http://twitter.com/#!/dailycollegian ; centredaily.com and pennlive.com for more info. Onward State is also a good site, and they have a Twitter feed as well.

  39. Hi Eagle,
    So sorry to read your posts; I’m sorry, that is, that you are struggling so. I’m going to give you my little input; I’m no intellect, but here’s my perspective as a Christian:

    God could have easily stopped this evil. God could have easily stopped every evil. God could have done this by never creating man. If man had not been created, there would have been no evil to contend with. But God did. Why? In order to offer us the opportunity to experience untold pleasures and satisfaction with God for all eternity. There was no selfish reason for this at all. God does not need man or man’s worship for His fulfillment; he create us for purely loving and altruistic reasons. Now, having created us, yes, He understood that man’s potential for evil was great, and there would be great sin because of our fundamental flaws, but He still allowed it so that man could have the opportunity to experience a life of eternity so glorious it would defy man’s imagination. Sin, evil…this kind of child abuse grieves God deeply, but it is the price that is paid for you and I to have been born. For God to eliminate all sin, he would have to not have created us in the first place. To create man who is incapable of sin is pointless; without the struggle to choose between good and evil there is no reason for the existence of man. God will create followers who love him, but He will not create mindless zombie worshipers; that is not to be our place as those created in the image of God.

    I find it a little troubling that we can sit back and blame God for the sins of man as though it is God’s fault because he in His mercy allowed any of us to be born. God says not to sin; God says not to cause little children to stumble; God says to abstain from evil; and we do not listen, and there are consequences, and we have the audacity to point a finger at Him and declare Him at fault, and declare that He has much to answer for. I could just as well blame you…have you done all you can to prevent evil in your community? Do you walk the streets at night looking to protect innocent victims. Do you go to the nursing homes in your area and demand to see if they are clean, or if the residents are cared for and well nurtured? There is much you can do to prevent evil, and yet you do not and you are not blamed; and we don’t say “I refuse to believe in or love Eagle, because he did not go out and do this or that to protect this random person or that random person; he could have been there, it’s possible, if he’d tried…you never know”. So why blame God for the natural consequence of evil which He has commanded not be done and yet was done anyway, in defiance of His Word, just because He decided in His mercy to create man? I’m sorry, I just don’t see any logic in your perspective. You are blaming a third party for the sins of another. This does not strike me as just at all, from even a simple practical standpoint. Why not just blame God for creating us at all and be done with it, then you never have to say another word on how awful God is.

    Also, for you to be an atheist is fine; it is a free country. But your being an atheist, or me becoming an atheist like you will not prevent evil from happening. It will happen as surely as the apple fell from the tree. Instead of blaming a God who hates sin, who has implored mankind for centuries to stop it, who has sent prophets and kings and His own Son to die to break its power, why not embrace the One who can step in and be a “father to the fatherless”, and heal the hearts of this poor children?

    You are surprised when people sin and there are consequences. You should be more surprised that God had the mercy to create any of us at all. You are angry at God (or would be if you believed) for putting up with sin; we should be thankful He does or we would all be instantly doomed.

  40. Thanks Numo. I think I’ll have to follow this one loosely but pray fervently for the victims! Some times I just want to clear some tables from the temple – so to speak! I just don’t want a huge public trial for the sake of the victims.

  41. Bridget2, I think there has to be “a huge public trial” in this case; there doesn’t seem to be any other way to deal with it.

    Understood re. “follow[ing] loosely” – and fervent prayer is needed, so good on you!

    (I’m finding it hard to be so close to actual events – and, likely, kids – and unable to do anything to help…)

  42. Most courts will treat victims who are minors with consideration, allowing in camera testimony, videotaped testimony with identification protected, etc., so that they are not publicly exposed.

  43. Really folks there’s no mystery about it (Penn State). The love of money is at the root of it. The dark side leads to greed and greed leads to suffering. Didn’t Master Yoda & the writer of the James epistle say something to that effect?

    For Eagle & Argo: We humans cannot do much about death (we all have an expiration date), earthquakes & tsunamis, those are beyond our control. I think numo was spot on when she said on a previous thread that supernatural intervention by the Almighty is more the exception than the rule (despite what some fervent evangelicals want to claim).

    The rest of the evil? WE HAVE THE POWER to end it. For every battered wife & every beaten child that cries out to God, we are God’s ears, and if need be, we are also his intervention. Conscience knows no caution.

  44. Sorry y’all I meant to say 1st Timothy chap. 6 concerning the love of money & greed thing.

  45. Tina
    Sadly he is not going to be coaching because he is getting death threats from supporters of Paterno, et al. This has nothing to do with people who are upset about the kids. Interesting, isn’t it? the football fans are threatening the guy. Those of us who advocate for children are not.

  46. Muff

    As more and more gets exposed about the Penn State situation, the more I am convinced there are two levels of sin here. One is to protect the money and a winning football team at all costs. The second is the depravity in men that would cause them to molest small children. Once again, as i see this play out I am convinced that the Bible has the only clear explanation of life as I see it. And, in the end, all will be well. If that were not so, I am not sure I could bear to hear about the abuse.

  47. Eagle,
    the God you are angry with is the only way out of evil–for all of us. My relationship with Christ changed my soul.. However consider the incredible, dramatic change of many others-story told again and again.
    That being said, the tragic story of the Penn State situation is that right now evil is happening-people are being sold, murdered, tortured and what are we as believers DOING and non believers to stop it. We all need to repent TODAY and look around us and the world to see how we can ACT as God’s representative of his merciful love, not stew about why.. So what will be done today in the name of Christ? These things we should do-protect the innocent and bring hope to those that suffer and SHOW others how evil can stop in a person’s life throught the Gospel and example of Christ. why do “bad things happen to good people” or “why does evil exist if god is loving?” Good questions, but for those of who can and are not so wounded we cannot, a better thing is to stop blaming God or others and act to stop EVIL today ourselves.

  48. Guest 34/Deb

    Words cannot epress my dismay.Thank you for sending this to us. Deb, you may want to do a post on this next week.

  49. Sadly he is not going to be coaching because he is getting death threats from supporters of Paterno, et al. This has nothing to do with people who are upset about the kids. Interesting, isn’t it? the football fans are threatening the guy. — Dee

    Because Football cannot be interfered with.

    “I was a Football Star in high school. Once I scored Three Touchdowns in one game…” — Al Bundy, Married with Children‘s forty-something Loser

  50. There is some appearance of McQueary making different statements about what he saw, what he did, and what he told to whom. The grand jury chose to believe him and the administrators. Interesting. Could be the wrong person was indicted?

    Grand juries make mistakes, and the standard of proof is “probable cause to believe a crime has occurred and probable cause that the indicted person committed said crime.” It is the reason we have trials, judges and juries where the standard of proof is higher and there is cross-examination of the witnesses.

  51. Arce
    There is more coming out about McQueary. Something about him continuing to support Sanduskey’s charities after the “incident.” Could there be a quid pro quo luring in the background? Who knows?

  52. i think there have likely been a LOT of quid pro quo deals going on over the years… (Though I have had to back off from following the news, as it was all getting to be a bit much.)

    It seems as if Pasterno’s “cooperation” with the grand jury investigation has allowed him some kind of immunity (though this has not been stated as such). I wonder if that can continue, though – ?

  53. Most of the reporting laws do not require third parties to report, that is, unless you observe or are told by a child or disabled victim, you are not required to report. If Paterno did tell his superiors and told McQueary to report it, he did more than most such laws require.

    What is interesting is that the two administrators were indicted for perjury, not for failure to do their duty in this matter. Thus the GJury believed McQueary, who appears to have difficulty keeping his story straight, but not the administrators.

  54. Guest 31
    This makes me sick. I think we will need to write about this. Keep these stories coming. We must get people to see the absolute horror of this supposedly “Christian” way to raise you kids.

  55. Frank Schaeffer would be easier to read if he turned down the hyperbole meter a few dozen notches.